We believed video blog content could be a major traffic driver to our website, but had concerns about producing it consistently. Learn how we got it right.

The Not So Secret Path to a 38.5% Increase in Blog Views

Mon Jun 15, 2015

We had a mission—drive more blog traffic.

We had a hypothesis—adding video would be a cost-effective tool.

We had a fear—video would be hard to produce consistently.

Ninety days later we achieved our mission.  

Total blog views grew 38.5% and best of all the introduction of video increased non-video views by 9.5%. Not only did we attract more visitors, they consumed more than just our video content. Win, Win! 

We proved our hypothesis.

We introduced two types of video segments (1) Talks short videos of Percussion employees sharing insights and experiences. (2) Interviews that host guest marketers talking content marketing. Using existing staff and $400 of equipment we built our own makeshift studio.

And we found our fear was completely unwarranted.

We knew we could produce video, but we weren’t sure we could produce it on a consistent basis. I’m happy to report we not only were consistent, we exceeded our expectations.

Idea Generation

Coming up with video ideas was easier than we expected. We kicked off the series with a brainstorm session that led to our first two talks and a couple of interview candidates. As it turned out inspiration was all around us and after our first brainstorm, scheduling a weekly video taping session became an easy part of our cadence. Instead of schedule separate ideation sessions we simple thought about how video could be applied to programs we were already discussing. We focused our efforts on finding individuals with a point of view rather than being rigid with our theme – although everything tied back in some way to the uber theme of content marketing. We quickly learned not to be afraid to ask for participation. Rarely did anyone say no—and when they did they were almost always on hand with a referral to a peer.  

Scheduling

Being flexible with the day and time of studio time turned out to be essential for capturing people when they could squeeze us in so we made sure two people on the team knew how to capture the footage.  We recruited in advance of when we needed video in some weeks capturing two or three videos, and in others we had no guests. This approach ensured we always had a backlog of quality content to share without the stress of being a slave to a taping schedule.

Optimization

This series was all about sharing ideas and nothing about flashy. We worked hard to put our participants at ease. We encouraged a conversational tone and never had to take more than a couple of takes. At the end of the 90 days we conducted an analysis of all the video produced. We learned that participants tuned in for an average of 1:24 seconds but that visitors stayed on the blog for much longer consuming other content. We’re going to be adding another camera angle to accommodate our interview format—we think more eye contact will increase video duration and drive up that number considerably. We’ll continue to experiment and optimize as we extend the series. 

Promotion

On average each video was shared 65 times, driving the majority of our traffic (67%). During our experiment the only active promotion we did was to tag the speaker in Twitter and send out an internal email making the team aware the video has posted. We believe additional focus on other channels, including LinkedIn and cross promotion on landing pages, will drive even further engagement.

Dipping our toe into video production has been very rewarding and much easier than we had expected. We hope it inspires you to do the same.

 

Samantha Stone
Samantha Stone
Marketing Advisory Network

Samantha is a fast growth, B2B marketing junkie, mother of four high energy boys and wannabe gourmet chef. Throughout her career she has launched go-to-market initiatives and lead marketing strategies for award-winning, high growth technology companies including Netezza, SAP, Ascential Software and Powersoft. In 2012 she founded The Marketing Advisory Network to help enterprises unleash the possible within their organizations. You can read more about her marketing philosophy and get practical advice by visiting her blog.

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